Group: Injuries & Rehabilitation

Created: 2012/01/01, Members: 50, Messages: 4461

Dealing with injuries and learning how to avoid them is extremely important!

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Sticky tendonitis solution

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flyonthewall
flyonthewall
Posts: 1,823
Joined: 2005/01/18
Canada
2006/01/31, 09:23 AM
This article helps a lot! I have a 1gal water bottle in my office that is about 1/2 filled with water. It has a nice little handle on the top, so I lifted it with my good arm and the lowered it, with control, with my "bad' arm, using a front "raise' motion. I think this will work well for an eccentric exercise. I also tried the same thing in a lat raise motion-starting with arm out front and rotating it to the side and then down- and it works as well. I can sure feel the weakness in that shoulder, but I don't get any sharp pain. I'm going to try 3 sets of 12, 1X/day (at home I'll try it with a 5lb ball I have). I'll up the weight slowly as it gets stronger. I sure hope this helps my shoulder...I can't even swim breast stroke anymore:(

Thanks wrestler!

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Even if you are on the right track, you will get run over if you just sit there.
wrestler125
wrestler125
Posts: 4,619
Joined: 2004/01/27
United States
2006/01/31, 01:50 PM
flyonethewall- your our official guinea pig, as for the first time in my life, im relatively injury free- Minus that toe I keep breaking.

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Iron and chalk.

Pain is only temporary, it is in your mind. If you can still walk, then you can still run.
sstump1
sstump1
Posts: 1,227
Joined: 2005/03/20
United States
2006/02/06, 03:10 PM
"while trying to impress the 21-year-old, silicon-enhanced babes in the gym can cause you to feel a twinge in a place where such a twinge is undesirable. "

They should have rephrased this.
2006/02/13, 03:46 AM
LOL sstump

arondaballer
arondaballer
Posts: 1,054
Joined: 2003/06/14
United States
2006/04/13, 01:33 AM
I've been doing the eccentric training for my achilles and it is working great. Though I've only been doing it 3 times a week with my hip stuff, it's working. Also, I'm taking Cissus RX.

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I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is the moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle-victorious.
--Vince Lombardi
"Decide what you want, decide what you are willing to exchange for it. Establish your priorities and go to work." H. L. Hunt

216chinook
216chinook
Posts: 89
Joined: 2006/02/12
Canada
2006/04/15, 11:49 AM
Excellent thread, my tricep tendon has flared up just this week. I felt a twinge (without those "silicon enhanced babes" several have referenced earlier) following Tuesdays workout. I just wrote it off to a good workout. Didn't think much of it until after yesterdays triceps pulldowns. That bag of frozen beans against the burning tricep last evening numbed the pain nicely!

I'll be starting eccentric training on this area soon. But first, I'll let this area rest a bit. Then I look at modifying the tricep pulldowns.....




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The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking.

Albert Einstein (1879–1955)

Yxven
Yxven
Posts: 76
Joined: 2004/09/05
United States
2006/05/13, 11:55 PM
Any idea which exercise to use to for tendinitis in the wrist (from computer use)?
jakewa3
jakewa3
Posts: 59
Joined: 2005/10/02
Canada
2006/06/03, 03:33 AM
Now just to figure out an exercise for my tennis elbow and golfers elbow.........most likely wrist curls and reverse arm curls.....
bb1fit
bb1fit
Posts: 11,105
Joined: 2001/06/30
United States
2006/06/18, 12:55 AM
Good stuff here from Dr. Strickland....

Tendinitis is frequently diagnosed among otherwise healthy people who play golf, tennis and other sports, or who participate in activities that require repetitive motion. Most people let the problem go for a time, even a period of many weeks, until pain becomes severe. Doctors typically then tell them they have tendinitis, an inflammation of a tendon, and to take NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including ibuprofen, naproxen and others) to calm the inflammation. So it was a surprise to read an editorial from the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine that reported there is seldom a reason to take NSAIDs for tendon issues. The reason -- most so-called tendinitis is actually an entirely different condition. Some experts are calling this situation the tendinitis myth.

TENDON MYTHOLOGY

For more information, I called Sabrina M. Strickland, MD, assistant attending orthopedic surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. Dr. Strickland explains that nearly all cases labeled tendinitis are in fact tendinosis, a condition that has nothing to do with inflammation. According to an article in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), animal studies show that within two to three weeks of an initial tendon injury, tendinosis is already present and inflammatory cells are absent. The problem is that many tendon injuries start out as tendinitis... however, the inflammation is not treated immediately. By waiting, the injury degrades into the damaged tissue of tendinosis. The ending "itis" refers to inflammation, but the "osis" ending means degeneration and that is what tendinosis is -- degeneration of a tendon, most commonly in the elbow, knee, shoulder and/or ankle. Although some people associate age with degenerating tendons, in fact age affects only tendons in the shoulders.

In tendinitis there is redness and swelling -- seen best in the hand or wrist where there is little soft tissue to mask the telltale evidence. In tendinosis, which is visible only through MRI, the affected area of the tendon is whitish and gray because it is dead tissue. Dr. Strickland agrees that there is no biological basis for taking NSAIDs to treat tendinosis since there is no inflammation present to reduce -- although the drugs may help ease pain of tendinosis caused by the surrounding vital tissue becoming tender due to the proximal dead tissue. A better approach is to follow a plan to resolve tendinosis and its pain.

THE RIGHT WAY TO TREAT

So, if NSAIDs are the wrong way to treat tendinosis, what is the right way to treat?

According to Dr. Strickland, the first order of business when tendon pain develops is to quiet the affected area. Stop the particular activity, ice the joint (she recommends warmth only for muscle spasms and those are nearly always in the back) and wear a special cuff or band, found in sporting-goods stores or drug stores, just below the area. The band decreases stress on the tendon and is good for pain management as well.

Physical therapy: Interestingly, most tendon injuries are not from overusing a tendon, but from incorrect form, such as flexing the wrist incorrectly when gardening or playing tennis. Consequently, working with a coach or other expert or physical therapist on the proper physical motions to use for a given activity is crucial.

Therapists design individualized exercise programs to improve range of motion and strength. The exercise technique used in the last few years to treat tendinosis is called eccentric loading, which involves stressing the muscles in the extended phase rather than the more usual contracted phase. For example, therapists may have a patient squat on the stronger leg and lift the weaker (eccentric) leg -- the one being rehabilitated. Therapists also, and importantly, help refine proper techniques for patients to use in the sport or activity that caused the tendon injury in the first place.

Dr. Strickland also urges flexibility training. Interestingly, she says that if you stretch regularly, for example, with yoga, Pilates, stretch classes or others, there is no need to stretch before or after an activity. The key is to have and maintain ongoing flexibility.

Finally, strengthening exercises are good as well because building muscles around the joint will help protect it from additional stress. Again, work with a physical therapist on appropriate exercises to build the muscles around the tendons.

Dr. Strickland suggests that people follow this action plan for several weeks, but if the tendinosis hasn't resolved itself by then, check back with the doctor regarding additional steps. Note: Doctors used to give corticosteroid shots for tendinosis, but, like with NSAIDs, these shots treat inflammation, so while they may relieve pain temporarily, they do not have any lasting affect on healing. One exception for using corticosteroid shots is in treating shoulder cuff tendinosis because bursa, fluid-filled sacs between tendons and bones that provide a slippery surface, sit atop the rotator cuff, and these often are inflamed and respond to anti-inflammation treatment -- at least temporarily.



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Maximus from Gladiator....Strength and Honor!
flyonthewall
flyonthewall
Posts: 1,823
Joined: 2005/01/18
Canada
2006/06/19, 11:27 AM
Excellent information Ron and I agree with this 100%. Through physical therapy, coaching on proper lifting form (especially bench) and building strength in the stabalizing muscles of my shoulder, my tendonitis (or I should say tendonosis) is finally abating. However, when ever I over use it, especially with poor form, it flares up again...makes sense! I've been trying the eccentric loading as well--based on advice from wrester, and although I don't remember to do it often, I'm sure it's helping.

Thanks for the great info!

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Even if you are on the right track, you will get run over if you just sit there.
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