Group: Running

Created: 2012/01/02, Members: 196, Messages: 66

Everything and all you need to know about beginning, training, eating, injury rehabilitation for running.

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Sticky The Couch to Running A 5K Plan

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Ravenbeauty
Ravenbeauty
Posts: 3,755
Joined: 2002/09/24
United States
2012/01/02, 02:36 PM
This is a great read for those who are interested in starting out on running by Josh Clark. 
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The Couch-to-5K Running Plan
Our beginner's running schedule has helped thousands of new runners get off the couch and onto the roads, running 3 miles in just two months.
By Josh Clark

Too many people have been turned off of running simply by trying to start off too fast. Their bodies rebel, and they wind up miserable, wondering why anyone would possibly want to do this to themselves.
You should ease into your running program gradually. In fact, the beginners' program we outline here is less of a running regimen than a walking and jogging program. The idea is to transform you from couch potato to runner, getting you running three miles (or 5K) on a regular basis in just two months.
It's easy to get impatient, and you may feel tempted to skip ahead in the program, but hold yourself back. Don't try to do more, even if you feel you can. If, on the other hand, you find the program too strenuous, just stretch it out. Don't feel pressured to continue faster than you're able. Repeat weeks if needed and move ahead only when you feel you're ready.
 
A few minutes each week
Each session should take about 20 or 30 minutes, three times a week. That just happens to be the same amount of moderate exercise recommended by numerous studies for optimum fitness. This program will get you fit. (Runners who do more than this amount are doing it for more than fitness, and before long you might find yourself doing the same as well).
Be sure to space out these three days throughout the week to give yourself a chance to rest and recover between efforts. And don't worry about how fast you're going. Running faster can wait until your bones are stronger and your body is fitter. For now focus on gradually increasing the time or distance you run.
 
Run for time, or run for distance
There are two ways to follow this program, to measure your runs by time or by distance. Either one works just as well, choose the option that seems easiest for you to keep track of. If you go with the distance option, and you are not using a track to measure the distances, just estimate. It's not important to have the distances absolutely exact.
Before setting out, make sure to precede each session with a five-minute warm-up walk or jog. Be sure to stretch both before and after.
niqwilliams
niqwilliams
Posts: 2
Joined: 2011/09/01
United States
2012/01/05, 11:16 AM
So, I am basically using just treadmills and elipticals right now but would it be better to go actually run at the track to work on the mile and a half and just work up to running the whole thing?  Any suggestions would be great!

Thanks,

Naqueya
Ravenbeauty
Ravenbeauty
Posts: 3,755
Joined: 2002/09/24
United States
2012/01/07, 09:52 PM
Hi Naqueya and welcome. You'd be surprised at the huge difference between running on the elliptical & treadmill versus actual running. It will be something that you progress into. If you are able too, try running on soft surfaces first (local nature trails, school/park or dirt or rubber tracks). This will be less pain and impact on your knees going into it. Also remember, running shoes are key to caring for your feet, knees and legs. If you are considering running as an avid interest, I would suggest getting shoes that will fit your training. I will be posting an article on how to pick the right running shoe on here next week.
Ravenbeauty
Ravenbeauty
Posts: 3,755
Joined: 2002/09/24
United States
2012/01/07, 09:56 PM
Also, as with anything new, you have to progress into it. I am not sure of your running level on anything, whether it is actually running or jogging or a combination of all. But gradually starting and working your way up to a full sprint is my best suggestion.
Maximama
Maximama
Posts: 1
Joined: 2012/01/11
United Kingdom
2012/01/11, 08:41 AM
I have been really drawn to running for a long time but never got beyond the thought of looking like a complete idiot going bright red and getting flustered after 30 seconds..is it ok to start off at the gym? I am generally very unfit anyway..I could do with getting used to the regular exercise. I also live in the city and am bothered about where to run safely as I don't have an excersise buddy of any sort. Tips and advice very gratefully received! Thanks.
Ravenbeauty
Ravenbeauty
Posts: 3,755
Joined: 2002/09/24
United States
2012/01/11, 11:17 AM
Starting off in the gym is a great idea... and since you are not very fit at the moment, I would suggest starting off walking, to brisk walking, to jogging, then progress into running.  The breathing pattern is a very tricky thing and that is what mostly deters people from beginning to run in the first place.  As you walk take deep normal breathes in through the nostrils out through the mouth.  It will be difficult at first, but once you stay consistent with it, it will start to come natural. 

Question?  Do you walk at all right now?  If so, how long per session and how many days per week?  This will give me a better view of where you are at and get you started on a simple treadmill plan.
blondeiangel
blondeiangel
Posts: 25
Joined: 2012/02/03
United States
2012/02/08, 10:08 PM
ok so i have been working out and eating for a total of 5 days now (not five days in a row) but i tried running today and i think i started out running to fast for my first time of running cause i was huffing and puffing and i didn't even get very far and had to slow down to walking, what do you suggest i do to fix that cause i'd like to be able to go run of a morning just to have something to get me going the days i don't have classes (i only have them monday's and tuesday's) if someone could help me i would appreciate it :)

thank you
-Peyton-
Ravenbeauty
Ravenbeauty
Posts: 3,755
Joined: 2002/09/24
United States
2012/03/28, 06:20 PM
Peyton, if you've never ran before, it is very important that you start out light and build up your speed as you progress.  Check out the link below, it is how to run your first 5K, but it is also a good starting point for someone first getting into running.  It's going to be a little rough at first, as your body is foreign to it, but some endurance and a little of pushing yourself, your body will adapt and you will run like a well maintained engine.  Everything will sync and you will learn what the "zone" is.  

http://halhigdon.com/training/50933/5K-Novice-Training-Program
blondeiangel
blondeiangel
Posts: 25
Joined: 2012/02/03
United States
2012/03/31, 11:24 AM
alright thank you so much :D

-Peyton-
4tksbutterfly
4tksbutterfly
Posts: 1
Joined: 2011/11/29
United States
2012/05/28, 01:40 AM
I am 38 years old next week. I have a few friends that are avid runners. And I have seen them become so passionate about it and feel better. Look better. I have arthritus. My concern is how much is too much when starting out. I have an app that I haven't used yet on my android that looks easy to follow. Time for an overhaul on my diet and my body. The 15 pounds I have put on is hurting me. Time for change.
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