Group: General Mental Health & Well-being

Created: 2011/12/31, Members: 44, Photos: 0, Messages: 9

Get involved with the discussion and fellow members with your own questions or advice to share. Simply click above to get started.

 
Back to topic list
Sticky The Influence of Exercise on Mental Health
  • 2012/01/03, 12:25 PM
    Below is a great article written by Dr. Daniel Landers on the great influence exercise has on your mental health...

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------The Influence of Exercise on Mental HealthDaniel M. Landers
    ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITYORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AS SERIES 2, NUMBER 12, OF THE PCPFS RESEARCH DIGESTHIGHLIGHT
    • "We now have evidence to support the claim that exercise is related to positive mental health as indicated by relief in sympotoms of depression and anxiety."

    A NOTE FROM THE EDITORSMental health as discussed in this paper by Dr. Daniel Landers, a leading authority on this topic, focuses on conditions sometimes considered to be illness states (i.e., pathological depression) as well as conditions that limit wellness or quality of life (i.e., anxiety, low self-esteem). To aid the reader, some basic terms used in this paper are outlined in the boxes below.DefinitionsAcute. Acute refers to something that occurs at a specific time often for a relatively short duration. For example, acute exercise refers to a bout of exercise done at a specific time for a specific amount of time. Acute anxiety is anxiety that exists in a person in response to a specific event (same as state anxiety).Anxiety. Anxiety is a form of negative self-appraisal characterized by worry, self-doubt, and apprehension.Chronic. Chronic refers to something that persists for a relatively long period of time. Chronic depression, for example, would be depression that lasts a long time. A chronic exerciser is someone who does exercise on a regular basis.Depression. Depression is a state of being associated with feelings of hopelessness or a sense of defeat. People with depression often feel “down” or “blue” even when circumstances would dictate otherwise. All people feel “depressed” at times, but a “depressed” person feels this way much of the time.Clinical depression. This is depression (see definition) that persists for a relatively long period of time or becomes so severe that a person needs special help to cope with day-to-day affairs.Meta-analysis. A type of statistical analysis that researchers use to make sense of many different research studies done on the same topic. By analyzing findings from many different studies, conclusions can be drawn concerning the results of all studies considered together. Both unpublished and published studies can be included in this type of analysis.Positive mood. Positive self-assessments associated with feelings of vigor, happiness, and/or other positive feelings of well-being.State anxiety. State anxiety is anxiety present in very specific situations. For example, state sports anxiety is present when a person is anxious in a specific sports situation even if the person is not generally anxious.Trait anxiety. Trait anxiety is the level of anxiety present in a person on a regular basis. A person with high trait anxiety is anxious much of the time while a person low in trait anxiety tends to be anxious less often and in fewer situations.Reduced anxiety
    • Mental Health Benefits of Physical Activity
       
    • Best results with “aerobic exercise”
    • Best after weeks of regular exercise
    • Best benefits to those who are low fit to begin with
    • Best benefits for those high in anxiety to begin withReduced depression
    • Best after weeks of regular exercise
    • Best when done several times a week
    • Best with more vigorous exercise
    • Best for those who are more depressed (needs more research)Benefits (anxiety and depression) similar to those for other treatments Activity associated with positive self-esteem Activity associated with restful sleep Activity associated with ability to respond to stress

  • 2013/01/29, 09:56 AM
    HI, I have been diagnosed with major depression (at age 9) and have started  using medications and therapy.  Now at 50, I realize that the only things used for most of my life to combat my depression was diet and exercise.  I will no longer be able to use only diet and exercize because I have recently also been affected by Panic Disorder and Post Tramatic Stress (which is believed to have triggered the panic disorder).  

    So when I read the article and the section 
    • Mental Health Benefits of Physical Activity 
        
    • Best results with “aerobic exercise” 
    • Best after weeks of regular exercise 
    • Best benefits to those who are low fit to begin with 
    • Best benefits for those high in anxiety to begin withReduced depression 
    • Best after weeks of regular exercise 
    • Best when done several times a week 
    • Best with more vigorous exercise 
    • Best for those who are more depressed (needs more research)

    I remembered that the only thing used to treat children in the 60's and 70's was coping skills, diet and exercize.  Now I am at the point where I need to lose over 50 pounds, and am finding challenges I didn't face when I was young.  Thank you for starting this group!

    RavenbeautyBelow is a great article written by Dr. Daniel Landers on the great influence exercise has on your mental health...

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------The Influence of Exercise on Mental HealthDaniel M. Landers
    ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITYORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AS SERIES 2, NUMBER 12, OF THE PCPFS RESEARCH DIGESTHIGHLIGHT

    A NOTE FROM THE EDITORSMental health as discussed in this paper by Dr. Daniel Landers, a leading authority on this topic, focuses on conditions sometimes considered to be illness states (i.e., pathological depression) as well as conditions that limit wellness or quality of life (i.e., anxiety, low self-esteem). To aid the reader, some basic terms used in this paper are outlined in the boxes below.DefinitionsAcute. Acute refers to something that occurs at a specific time often for a relatively short duration. For example, acute exercise refers to a bout of exercise done at a specific time for a specific amount of time. Acute anxiety is anxiety that exists in a person in response to a specific event (same as state anxiety).Anxiety. Anxiety is a form of negative self-appraisal characterized by worry, self-doubt, and apprehension.Chronic. Chronic refers to something that persists for a relatively long period of time. Chronic depression, for example, would be depression that lasts a long time. A chronic exerciser is someone who does exercise on a regular basis.Depression. Depression is a state of being associated with feelings of hopelessness or a sense of defeat. People with depression often feel “down” or “blue” even when circumstances would dictate otherwise. All people feel “depressed” at times, but a “depressed” person feels this way much of the time.Clinical depression. This is depression (see definition) that persists for a relatively long period of time or becomes so severe that a person needs special help to cope with day-to-day affairs.Meta-analysis. A type of statistical analysis that researchers use to make sense of many different research studies done on the same topic. By analyzing findings from many different studies, conclusions can be drawn concerning the results of all studies considered together. Both unpublished and published studies can be included in this type of analysis.Positive mood. Positive self-assessments associated with feelings of vigor, happiness, and/or other positive feelings of well-being.State anxiety. State anxiety is anxiety present in very specific situations. For example, state sports anxiety is present when a person is anxious in a specific sports situation even if the person is not generally anxious.Trait anxiety. Trait anxiety is the level of anxiety present in a person on a regular basis. A person with high trait anxiety is anxious much of the time while a person low in trait anxiety tends to be anxious less often and in fewer situations.Reduced anxiety
    •  
    • Best results with “aerobic exercise”
    • Best after weeks of regular exercise
    • Best benefits to those who are low fit to begin with
    • Best benefits for those high in anxiety to begin withReduced depression
    • Best after weeks of regular exercise
    • Best when done several times a week
    • Best with more vigorous exercise
    • Best for those who are more depressed (needs more research)Benefits (anxiety and depression) similar to those for other treatments Activity associated with positive self-esteem Activity associated with restful sleep Activity associated with ability to respond to stress



  • ---
 
© 2012 FreeTrainers.com - Fitness guide - Nutrition guide - Find workouts - Find exercises - Groups - Members
Company info - Help - Terms of service - Privacy policy - Contact us